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WSJ.com: What's News US Thu, 26 Apr 2018 03:44:30 EDT
WSJ.com: What's News Technology Thu, 26 Apr 2018 00:30:18 EDT
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WSJ.com: US Business Thu, 26 Apr 2018 03:43:27 EDT
  • Facebook Posts Surge in Revenue as It Tackles User-Data Crisis  - Facebook, in its first earnings report after touching off widespread data-privacy concerns, posted soaring revenue and profit that highlighted the company’s central place in the digital economy.
  • Beijing Ready to Hit Back if U.S. Curbs Chinese Investments  - The U.S. threat of investment restrictions is already dampening the enthusiasm of Chinese businesses, with some canceling or slowing plans to invest in the American market.
  • Tesla's Autopilot Hit With More Turmoil as Leader Departs for Intel  - The head of Tesla’s Autopilot semiautonomous-driving system departed for Intel, adding new turmoil to a key program for the auto maker that is already beset by executive departures and safety questions.
  • NBC Bet $69 Million on Megyn Kelly---Then Viewers Vanished  - The former Fox News star was supposed to bring a bigger audience for “Today.” Instead, ratings declines and high production costs have been a drag on a critical franchise, an expensive reminder of how the heyday of the star network anchor has passed.
  • Shell Profit Soars on Oil Recovery  - Royal Dutch Shell reported its highest quarterly net profit since 2013, as higher oil prices and years of cost cutting boosted earnings.
  • Financial Deregulation Throws Fuel on Already-Hot Economy  - Moves to ease post-crisis rules are spurring lending and risk-taking at a time when the industry is lowering its own standards amid a near-record economic expansion.
  • U.S. New Home Sales Rose in March  - U.S. new-home sales surged in March, capping off a strong first quarter in a segment of the housing market characterized by solid buyer demand.
  • U.S. Consumers More Confident in Economy  - Americans’ optimism increased this month, another sign the U.S. economy remains strong.
  • Nafta Proposal on Foreign Investments Jolts Energy Firms  - Energy firms are balking at a Trump administration proposal to change a part of Nafta that allows a U.S. business to take legal action if a foreign government harms the company’s investment in that country.
  • Comcast Pursues Sky, Sizes Up Bigger Move for Fox Assets  - Comcast has submitted a $31 billion bid to buy Sky, prompting the European pay-TV operator to drop its backing for a takeover by Fox and setting up a bidding war.
  • Qualcomm's Profit Tumbles as Royalty Disputes Continue  - Qualcomm said its profit plunged 52% from a year earlier as it dealt with a tangle of challenges, including Apple and Huawei Technologies continuing to withhold royalties.
  • Samsung's Earnings Hot Streak Continues  - Sales of memory chips drove the company’s fourth consecutive quarter of record operating profits, but investors are focused on how long the good times can keep rolling.
  • Greece's Business Prospects Brighten After Lost Decade  - As economic growth returns to Greece after a decade of crisis, so are some businesses that once wrote the country off.
  • As ECB Contemplates Rate Move, Storm Clouds Gather  - Trade disputes and a stronger currency are threatening a hard-fought economic recovery in the 19-nation eurozone, potentially delaying a move by the ECB to follow the Federal Reserve in increasing short-term interest rates.
  • American Express Is Ready to Charge Into China  - American Express cleared a hurdle in its yearslong effort to operate in China, potentially becoming the first U.S. card network to offer services there.
  • Huawei Under Criminal Investigation Over Iran Sanctions  - The Justice Department is probing whether Huawei violated U.S. sanctions related to Iran, opening a new avenue of scrutiny amid national-security concerns over the Chinese technology giant.
  • Boeing to Open Plant in China This Year  - Boeing aims to have a new facility in China ready to complete some of its 737 jets by the end of this year, a sign that the aerospace giant is taking trade tensions in stride.
  • UPS Offers Buyouts to Some Managers  - UPS is offering buyouts to some management workers, aiming to reduce payroll as the company ramps up investments to handle the surge in online shopping.
WSJ.com: Markets Thu, 26 Apr 2018 00:05:54 EDT
  • Facebook Stays in the Friend Zone  - The social network’s first-quarter report showed that about 48 million daily active users signed up during the period, suggesting that the world’s largest social network isn’t easily unplugged despite its recent problems.
  • A Healthier Viacom Makes a CBS Deal Trickier  - Struggling media company Viacom’s revival won’t make reaching a deal with CBS any easier.
  • Higher Rates Hide a World of Easy Money  - The 10-year U.S. Treasury yield has returned to 3% for the first time since early 2014 and markets are clearly sensitive to higher rates. But the bigger picture is that investors are still living in a world with very low rates.
  • Resurgent Twitter Is No Free Bird  - Twitter’s strong first-quarter results support the case for a recovering business, but much was already priced in.
  • Beware the Chinese Tech IPO Rush  - Several Chinese household tech names are planning to list this year. The hype already looks out of control.
  • Credit Suisse Finds Right Formula for Fickle Markets  - Credit Suisse has spent the past couple of years focusing on what it could control and worrying less about what it couldn’t: that approach is bearing fruit.
  • Why Wynn Remains a Risky Bet  - Steve Wynn has left the firm he founded, but the risks from his legacy remain and new management aren’t saying and doing the right things to reduce them.
  • How African Deals Entangled a Billionaire Media Mogul  - Investors already attach such a governance discount to Vivendi that allegations of bribery in Africa at its parent company may not add much.
  • Can Throwing Darts Beat Hedge-Fund Managers' Stock Picks?  - The Heard on the Street team is going toe-to-toe against the recommendations of hedge-fund managers who attend Monday’s annual Sohn Investment Conference.
WSJ.com: Opinion Thu, 26 Apr 2018 00:30:07 EDT
  • The Regressive State of America  - Federal income data offer a tragic lesson in bad policy: Connecticut.
  • Pentagon Spending Sanity  - Some good ideas to kill redundant defense programs.
  • Operation Muppet Freedom  - The TV habits of children have changed. Regulators haven’t.
  • Trump's Travel Ban Traps U.S. Citizens  - Young children of Yemeni-American men are stuck in Djibouti because their mothers can’t get visas.
  • Climate Activists Are Lousy Salesmen  - From turgid battle cries to hypocritical spokesmen, it’s no wonder they turn so many Americans off.
  • Comey's Loyalty Isn't to the Truth  - Vital facts are missing from his accounts of two episodes from the Bush presidency.
  • Millennials Hit the Great Books  - ‘The hardest course you will ever take’ and the most rewarding.
  • Trump Takes the Lead Against Russia  - America’s sanctions are now stronger than the European Union’s.
  • From Parkland to Waffle House  - Society ‘dropped the ball’ on Nikolas Cruz and Travis Reinking. A hero picked it up.
  • Teachers on Strike  - The AFT and NEA don’t have students’ best interests at heart any more than the UAW has those of auto buyers.
  • Macron's Democratic Vision  - The French president argues for an open society grounded in European ‘identity.’
  • Alfie Evans and the State  - A medical debate that’s gone global is not about the money. It’s about power.
 
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